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Which foreign language should you learn? [The Washington Post]

Which foreign language should you learn? [The Washington Post]

Which foreign language should you learn? [The Washington Post] http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/worldviews/wp/2015/02/26/quiz-which-foreign-language-should-you-learn/ Are you interested in getting to know more about foreign languages you could potentially learn? Here are the other 10 languages you could have had as a result of this quiz. French: A trip to Paris would only be one advantage of mastering French. TheRead more about Which foreign language should you learn? [The Washington Post][…]

[Learning Korean] 좋은 시간 보내세요!

[Learning Korean] 좋은 시간 보내세요!

좋은 시간 보내세요 [joh-oon shee-gahn boh-neh-seh-yoh]! 좋은 – [joh-oon] means “good” or “nice”; it’s an adjective, and this form is used only in front of noun, as a modifier. 시간 – [shee-gahn] means “time” or “hour” and it’s a noun. 보내세요 – [boh-neh-seh-yoh] means “to spend (time)” in predicative form. So, once these words areRead more about [Learning Korean] 좋은 시간 보내세요![…]

[Learning Korean] 괜찮아요.

[Learning Korean] 괜찮아요.

괜찮아요. [gwen-chah-nah-yoh] – It’s (or I’m) okay. or It’s (I’m) all right. 괜찮습니다. [gwen-chahn-soom-nee-dah] – (a little more respectful version) 괜찮아요? [gwen-chah-nah-yoh?] – Is it okay? Are you okay? 괜찮습니까? [gwen-chahn-soom-nee-ggah?] – (a little more respectful version) “It’s okay.” in Korean language could be either an affirmative answer showing it’s or you’re really okay, or justRead more about [Learning Korean] 괜찮아요.[…]

[Learning Korean] 날씨 _______ 좋아요!

[Learning Korean] 날씨 _______ 좋아요!

날씨 reads “nahl-ssee” and means “weather.” 좋아요 [joh-ah-yoh] is one of the most frequently used expressions in Korean, meaning “something/someone’s good” or “to like something/someone.” So, literally it translates “The weather is good!” In Korean language, a typical structure order is Subject+Object+Predicative, so now this sentence has only Subject and Predicative. Predicative must be placed atRead more about [Learning Korean] 날씨 _______ 좋아요![…]

[Learning Korean] "Who" "When" "Where"

[Learning Korean] "Who" "When" "Where"

  누구 means “Who” in English, and it reads [noo-goo]. 언제 is “When” and reads [uhn-jeh]. 어디 is “Where” and reads [uh-dee]. If you combine 누구 and ~이에요? together, then it becomes 누구(이)에요? [noo-goo-eh-yoh?] or 누구입니까? [noo-goo-eem-nee-ggah?] (입니까? is the question version of ~입니다 – see details in previous post.) Then it means, “Who is it?” orRead more about [Learning Korean] "Who" "When" "Where"[…]

[Learning Korean] ~ 이에요 – Subject+Be verb ~.

[Learning Korean] ~ 이에요 – Subject+Be verb ~.

~이에요 is another most frequently used expression in Korean. It literally means “something or someone is _____.” It clearly states the existence or the identity of someone or something (singular and plural all together). You can read this as [ee-eh-yoh]. ~입니다 [eem-nee-dah] is the same, but more formal. These two expressions are predicative, so they are placed at theRead more about [Learning Korean] ~ 이에요 – Subject+Be verb ~.[…]

[Learning Korean] 좋아요 – It is good. or I like it!

[Learning Korean] 좋아요 – It is good. or I like it!

좋아요 is one of the most frequently used expressions in Korean. It literally means “something or someone is good.” Also, it could be used for the meaning of “I like ~.” You can read this as [joh-ah-yoh]. Typically the expression ending with -요 [-yoh] is a common predicative in Korean, and it’s placed at theRead more about [Learning Korean] 좋아요 – It is good. or I like it![…]